NEW TO MEDITATION OR SHAMBHALA?

Join us for a FREE Meditation Open House and let us help you get started!

Shambhala Meditation is based on the premise that the natural state of the mind is calm and clear. It’s a practice that anyone can do. Learn to meditate and develop mindfulness awareness by attending any of our open houses or introductory classes.

 

IKEBANA : JAPANESE FLOWER ARRANGING

Shambhala Chicago – West Loop at 37 N Carpenter St. – APRIL 26 & 27

GrandOpening

 

Founded by Chögyam Trungpa in 1982, joins the two practices of mindfulness and ikebana. In this workshop we will work with our state of mind as we engage in arranging flowers using the elements of heaven, earth and human. Training in this way helps us to connect fully to our world with non-aggression and to express our heart and mind through flowers. This workshop is open to beginners and non-beginners. Saturday will offer an introduction and Sunday will go deeper into the practice.

Lunch will be offered both days at a cost of $10/day.

Click here to read more and to register

 

 

Featured Programs

Ikebana : Japanese Flower Arranging for Beginners and Non-Beginners

with Brooke Pohl

April 26th—April 27th

Kalapa Ikebana, founded by Chögyam Trungpa in 1982, joins the two practices of mindfulness and ikebana. Continue »

The Art of Being Human (Level 1)

with Shastri David Stone

May 3rd—May 4th

The weekend includes meditation practice, discussion, and individual meetings with meditation instructors. n this 2 day workshop, students are introduced to the idea of basic goodness and the practice of meditation in a supportive, social environment. Continue »


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